Womens Rowing – Crew Gonzaga http://crewgonzaga.com/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 20:09:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://crewgonzaga.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Womens Rowing – Crew Gonzaga http://crewgonzaga.com/ 32 32 7 destinations on the mountain tops, perfect for a summer vacation https://crewgonzaga.com/7-destinations-on-the-mountain-tops-perfect-for-a-summer-vacation/ https://crewgonzaga.com/7-destinations-on-the-mountain-tops-perfect-for-a-summer-vacation/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 16:30:00 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/7-destinations-on-the-mountain-tops-perfect-for-a-summer-vacation/ The beach may be fun, but for a certain type of outdoor enthusiast, there is nothing better than the dry, temperate climate and the recreational opportunities in the mountains. Hike? To go biking? Kayaking? Encounters with Wildlife? These mountain towns are famous for alpine adventures and sophisticated accommodations. Aspen’s outdoor dining scene. aspen, Colorado Here […]]]>

The beach may be fun, but for a certain type of outdoor enthusiast, there is nothing better than the dry, temperate climate and the recreational opportunities in the mountains. Hike? To go biking? Kayaking? Encounters with Wildlife? These mountain towns are famous for alpine adventures and sophisticated accommodations.

Aspen’s outdoor dining scene.

aspen, Colorado

Here culture is taken just as seriously as outdoor activities. In one day, it’s natural to enjoy a hike through wildflower meadows, attend a lecture by an artist from the Venice Biennale, and attend a late afternoon concert before dining at the Japanese hotspot’s Aspen outpost Nakazawa.

In a day, it’s natural to enjoy a hike through wildflower meadows, attend a lecture by an artist at the Venice Biennale, and perhaps attend a concert before having dinner at Matsuhisa’s Aspen outpost. The city is celebrating the return of the Aspen music festival, Jazz Aspen Snowmass JAS, and Aspen Theater. Also on tap: new exhibits in the Aspen Art Museum (specifically Precious Okoyomonwhich will transform the roof into a garden installation where invasive and native plants pollinate each other to music); Workshops on sculpture, printmaking, photography and fine arts; Lectures in the iconic Anderson Ranch Arts Center; and the opening of new galleries like Almine Ruiz-Picassos Almine Rech and White cube.

Stay: Rent one hidden in the trees House, or book this Little Nelle, known for its glamorous restaurants and adventures such as Ride and Dine, a 15 mile hike to a ranch in Old Snowmass for al fresco dining in style.

Hutton Brickyards in the Catskills.

The cat skills, New York

New York state’s pastoral peaks and valleys are great for thigh-burn workouts, while the cities have cool charm. Picturesque walks: the Ashokan Rail Trailwhich runs along the Ashokan Reservoir; Panoramic mountainwhich follows a 19th century driveway to Echo Lake; the hairpin filled Tanbark loop; and 47,500 hectares Slide mountain wilderness, Home to the highest peak in the Catskills (4,180 feet).

In the evening music in the legendary Bearsville Theater in Woodstock (where Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan and Muddy Waters have performed) and Maverick concerts, the oldest summer chamber music festival in the USA

Stay: Hutton Brickworks

Thirty-one cabins with pine interiors and all-glass sides with river views characterize the green, rolling hills of Kingston, once part of the thriving bricklaying industry. Guests enjoy camp activities such as archery, croquet, and kayaking, as well as easy access to the city’s art galleries and restaurants.


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Works of art show highlights by geology artists https://crewgonzaga.com/works-of-art-show-highlights-by-geology-artists/ https://crewgonzaga.com/works-of-art-show-highlights-by-geology-artists/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 09:13:43 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/works-of-art-show-highlights-by-geology-artists/ BIG RAPIDS – Artworks currently shows the work of three nationally known artists. The pieces come from the Upper Peninsula; Photography, sculptures and drawings made from and inspired by rocks. The geology rocks! Collection includes pieces by artists Stephen Ross, Autumn Bildson and Juile Tyslicky. Ross is a naturalist and nature photographer; his work was […]]]>

BIG RAPIDS – Artworks currently shows the work of three nationally known artists.

The pieces come from the Upper Peninsula; Photography, sculptures and drawings made from and inspired by rocks.

The geology rocks! Collection includes pieces by artists Stephen Ross, Autumn Bildson and Juile Tyslicky.

Ross is a naturalist and nature photographer; his work was collected over a period of three years. He said he captures the uniqueness of abstract art, geological exposures of the upper peninsula.

“I see patterns more often than motifs, so I came up with so many patterns for the show,” said Ross.


Ross’ interest began in 2004 when he participated in an abstract art exhibition.

Ross hopes his imagery will instill an appreciation for the rocks and the geological times and forces that have shaped the landforms of the Upper Peninsula that we pass without realizing. He mentions that his works include lithoscapes, pareidolias and mimetolites.

“The oldest rocks in this collection of UP geological photographs are from the Neo-Archean Precambrian era about 2.7 billion years ago,” said Ross.

Another featured artist, Autumn Bildson, is a stone carver. For over 20 years she has been creating art for personal use, for sale or for the personal artistic request of a customer.


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Marilyn Butler’s vision for “Mapping Georgetown” https://crewgonzaga.com/marilyn-butlers-vision-for-mapping-georgetown/ https://crewgonzaga.com/marilyn-butlers-vision-for-mapping-georgetown/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 18:43:06 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/marilyn-butlers-vision-for-mapping-georgetown/ Imagine falling in love with your city. Then devote all of your creative endeavors to nurturing and preserving its unique culture and heritage. Georgetown-based Marilyn Butler did (and does) just that with her “Mapping Georgetown” project. Butler decided to capture and convey memories, impressions, family stories and details of life in Washington’s oldest neighborhood, a […]]]>


Imagine falling in love with your city. Then devote all of your creative endeavors to nurturing and preserving its unique culture and heritage. Georgetown-based Marilyn Butler did (and does) just that with her “Mapping Georgetown” project.

Butler decided to capture and convey memories, impressions, family stories and details of life in Washington’s oldest neighborhood, a place she “absolutely loves”. Her goal is to publish a book of highlights that will be made available in the Peabody Room of the Georgetown Public Library.

On a simple 8 ½ x 12 inch folded flyer with an overview map of Georgetown and a page for answers, Butler invites participants – young and old – to “reach for pen, markers, crayons and imagination!” And “have fun” [decorating] Your card to your heart’s content. ” Feel free, she adds, “to use words, pictures, vignettes, doodles and anecdotes”.

Since launching the project in 2019, participants have returned hundreds of fascinating and historically rich responses for Butler’s collection. With life normalizing somewhat since the pandemic, the project has picked up speed again and Butler is increasing the project’s social media presence.

As she does this, the mapped dots and memories begin to connect, the stories weave, and the Georgetown tapestry comes to life.

Butler’s own life is full of notable stories. She and her husband grew up in Cleveland, but when their sons started college here, they traveled frequently between Georgetown and Ohio. After giving birth to her first grandchild, she found a “nice” area for an apartment in Georgetown “Kitten’s corner across from Dumbarton Gardens,” she told The Georgetowner.

In Cleveland, where she grew up and still has a home, her father, a “50-year-old defense attorney,” was “taught to swim” by Elliot Ness on the beach near her home. In her family kitchen “Mrs. Stouffer made her apple pie ”and“ took her by tram to her restaurant in Public Square ”. And the “whole Stouffer empire began from there”.

Connecting people has always been an issue in Butler’s life. With a degree in business administration – or as she calls it, “a degree in survival” – Butler pioneered the wireless industry early and helped provide for her family of six. Eventually she retired as an executive at AT&T.

While at AT&T, she taught in her spare time at the Cleveland Museum of Art. She loved seeing details people observed in the artwork, hearing stories from people, and enjoying the creativity of the artists on display. To learn more and more about the exhibits and the perception of the audience is a “wonderful feeling”, she said. “I loved it … My [docent] Tours were tied to stories. And I would start and say, “What do you notice?” I told all the stories I had … and we discussed the period … it was really fun … And it has evolved. “

Always interested in photography, Butler took a Photoshop class at the museum. In Georgetown, she began to come into contact with people through her photography. After buying a piece of art from a store in Georgetown, the owner invited Butler to sell a framed photo she had taken of a rowing crew seen from Key Bridge. Before her family members could visit the store to see the photo on sale, it sold for over $ 1,000.

Out of love for the neighborhoods of Georgetown, she created a poster collage for “Georgetown Doors” that sold well. While taking the poster to donate to the Georgetown Public Library, she met Jerry McCoy, the special collections librarian / archivist in the Peabody Room. Since Butler was interested in photographing Georgetown, McCoy showed her a book called “Georgetown Panorama”. Published in 1977 by the U.S. Commission on Fine Arts, the book of accordion-style collages to be used by the Old Georgetown Board captures the entire architectural street landscape of M Street and Wisconsin Ave. into Georgetown.

According to Butler, McCoy said “what he really wanted to see” is an update of that work, since he believes it is an extremely “crucial and important image reference tool.”

To McCoy’s surprise, since two other photographers hadn’t followed his suggestion, Butler saw the project finished.

McCoy was impressed with what Butler eventually produced, a self-released volume, M Street: A Georgetown Panorama. Butler’s book outshone the original 1977 black and white work, McCoy told The Georgetowner. “I was absolutely stunned by what she had done. She really stuck to the layout of the original work … She put the pictures together great. I was speechless. She did it all as a donation [to the library]. She took all the photos and just did a stunning and beautiful job. What she created will be just as important to future generations of researchers as the original … And she made everything out of her love for Georgetown. “

Butler’s intensive photographic work on the Georgetown Panorama project connected her closely with her neighbors and passers-by and set the stage for Mapping Georgetown. “People would stop me in the street and say, ‘I saw you taking pictures on M Street,” she said. “During this love work project … I spoke to a lot of people and it just grounded me in the neighborhood.”

Soon a cashier asked her to design another Georgetown poster to display near the cash register. When she thought about the project, she had a vision that the best way to bring Georgetown to life is to focus on the personal connections she loved with the people in the neighborhood. On a trip to Russia she had met someone who described the joys of story mapping and she had seen a mapping Manhattan storybook. “You know, mapping is one thing,” she told us. So the Mapping Georgetown project was born.

When Butler began handing out her story map cards to the “friends of Georgetown” she met, she used her faculty skills to provide spontaneous and impromptu responses. “People are often intrigued,” said Butler, “they say, ‘What is this?’ So I talk to them about it and usually they tell me something in conversation, so I say ‘there your story is right there’…. I’ve had a lot of people returning Georgetown stories to me saying, “I’m so glad you asked me for it because I didn’t think about it” [this] and I really enjoyed putting it together and writing about it. ‘”

In January 2020, the Washington Post got wind of Butler’s Mapping Georgetown project and highlighted its community conservation activism. “Marilyn Butler is one of [Georgetown’s] Residents obliged to catalog the events in the area….

“Without a doubt, what I like most about Georgetown is the people,” Butler told the Post. “Everyone I’ve met led me to someone else and the experience was magical.”

And now the Georgetown stories flow in – collected by Butler in person, by post or by email.

From Billy Martin of Martin’s Tavern: “One of my favorite quotes from one of my father’s stories is when Sam Rayburn and Lyndon Johnson were sitting in the dugout here in Martin’s Tavern, where Sam and my grandfather were discussing politics and Johnson kept trying to get into the conversation and Sam said, “Johnson, if you just shut up, maybe you could learn something !!” Signed: William (Billy) A. Martin, Jr., 4th generation

Butler tells this about Julia Child, Katharine Graham and Pamela Harriman. “Well the story is that Julia Childs lived in this house and she and Pamela Harriman and Katharine Graham couldn’t cook. So they started making lucky dinners and they got pretty good at it and see where Julia Childs got it. “

One story describes the mother of a writer whose “great-great-grandfather” told stories about riding the horse-drawn carriage from Georgetown to the White House with President Lincoln’s son Robert, who was a frequent passenger.

Another resident of Georgetown and author of “Unconditional Surrender: The Romance of Julia and Ulysses S. Grant” has marked the “final resting place of Emma Dent Casey, who is buried in the beautiful Oak Hill Cemetery” on the map. Casey’s writings helped give the author “Insights into Mr. and Mrs. Grant’s love affair.”

One respondent recalled the joys of archaeological research at the home site of Yarrow Mamout, one of Georgetown’s most historically significant African American residents. “As a volunteer on the DC Preservation Office’s archeology team, I was privileged to help excavate the Yarrow Mamout homeland. I have fond memories of my work and my time in Georgetown! “

An eyewitness of the fire that nearly burned the Georgetown Public Library in April 2007 tells her story. “On the corner of R and Wisconsin, NW, on the day of the fire in Georgetown DCPL, I saw the original flames come off the roof. A small crowd had gathered and I joined them while we waited anxiously for the fire trucks to arrive… ”This map story connected several points for Butler. To McCoy’s relief, the beloved portrait of Yarrow Mamout in the Peabody Room had been rescued from the conflagration.

Butler contributed one of her own stories – an article on the racial integration of the Holy Trinity School. She had written an interview for the school about Adele Dodson, the school’s first black student.

Some of the most touching stories describe Georgetown’s daily life. “This is a special gem of Georgetown – we all know and care about each other – singles, couples, families with babies and children – we share the walks, blow leaves and water plants – if you go too fast, you miss the ones Magic, ”wrote Judith Burnell. One child was especially proud of their grandfather, who works at Georgetown Cupcake, and they included a small cupcake drawing.

“Everything leads to something else. So whatever your interests, there are limitless story and relationship opportunities, ”Butler said.

Meanwhile, McCoy looks forward to exhibiting the Mapping Georgetown collection in the Peabody Room. In addition to the bound volume, he would like to present the highlights of Georgetown history on the digital collections (DigDC) page of the DC Public Library.

“I’d really like to see a Marilyn Butler do something similar in all the other neighborhoods of DC,” said McCoy. “It’s such important information that needs to be captured. They’re like little miniature oral lore … it’s really a nice thing she does. “

To participate in the Mapping Georgetown Project, go to https://mappinggeorgetown.com/, visit MappingGeorgetown on Instagram or get a flyer from the Georgetown Public Library.

Stay tuned! In the coming editions, The Georgetowner will work with Marilyn Butler to bring stories from the “Mapping Georgetown” project to light. We will also be offering our own graphical features on people who have lived in Georgetown in the past and who live here today.

KeywordsBilly MartinFamous GeorgetownersGeorgetowngeorgetownerHistoric GeorgetownJulia Childmapping Georgetownmarilyn butlerMartin’s TavernNeighbourhood NewsReal Estate



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Laowa 14mm f / 4 Zero-D lens extends the super wide-angle view of Canon and Nikon DSLRs https://crewgonzaga.com/laowa-14mm-f-4-zero-d-lens-extends-the-super-wide-angle-view-of-canon-and-nikon-dslrs/ https://crewgonzaga.com/laowa-14mm-f-4-zero-d-lens-extends-the-super-wide-angle-view-of-canon-and-nikon-dslrs/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 09:25:24 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/laowa-14mm-f-4-zero-d-lens-extends-the-super-wide-angle-view-of-canon-and-nikon-dslrs/ Venus Optics has launched the Laowa 14mm f / 4 Zero-D lens for full frame DSLRs. The mirrorless version of the lens was launched last year, but now the design has been reconfigured to meet the longer back focus needs of Canon and Nikon DSLRs. As the name suggests, the lens produces an almost distortion-free […]]]>


Venus Optics has launched the Laowa 14mm f / 4 Zero-D lens for full frame DSLRs. The mirrorless version of the lens was launched last year, but now the design has been reconfigured to meet the longer back focus needs of Canon and Nikon DSLRs. As the name suggests, the lens produces an almost distortion-free image from a lens with a super wide angle of view.

The manual focus lens costs $ 499 and offers an impressively short minimum focus distance of 14.5 cm that allows for macro-like images – but the focal length will make the lens most attractive to landscape and architectural photographers.

Chris George has been working on Digital Camera World since its inception in 2017. He has written on photography, cell phones, video production, and technology for over 30 years – and has edited numerous magazines including PhotoPlus, N-Photo, Digital Camera, Video Camera, and Professional Photography.

His first serious camera was the iconic Olympus OM10, which won him the Young Photographer of the Year title long before the advent of autofocus and memory cards. Today he uses a Nikon D800, a Fujifilm X-T1, a Sony A7 and his iPhone 11 Pro.

He has written about technology for countless publications and websites including The Sunday Times Magazine, The Daily Telegraph, Dorling Kindersley, What Cellphone, T3, and Techradar.



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Lantern Strike (Severe Solitude) – The Brooklyn Rail https://crewgonzaga.com/lantern-strike-severe-solitude-the-brooklyn-rail/ https://crewgonzaga.com/lantern-strike-severe-solitude-the-brooklyn-rail/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 20:19:37 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/lantern-strike-severe-solitude-the-brooklyn-rail/ On view 47 channelJune 25 – July 30, 2021new York Cinema stories usually follow a timeline of technical and mechanical innovations. Recognizing the forerunners of cinema or protokino, historians refer to early shadow puppets, slide projectors with magic lanterns, and the first instances of photography to capture movement over time. in the Lantern strike (severe […]]]>


On view

47 channel
June 25 – July 30, 2021
new York

Cinema stories usually follow a timeline of technical and mechanical innovations. Recognizing the forerunners of cinema or protokino, historians refer to early shadow puppets, slide projectors with magic lanterns, and the first instances of photography to capture movement over time.

in the Lantern strike (severe loneliness), her second solo exhibition at 47 Canal, Cici Wu presents nine sculptures, four drawings and a video from 2021 that invite us to broaden our understanding of proto-cinema by showing the way for light, perception and philosophy. Wu considers this reinterpretation of early cinema to be “outside the existing framework of cinema history”. She tries to align proto-cinema with what she calls “light, optical experiences and the abstraction of images”.

This includes the timeless play of light and shadow from sources that are sometimes taken for granted, such as lamps or moonlight. We could also think about how people can interpret the same light differently. Firelight can, for example, suggest ceremony, celebration, light that drives away the darkness and home, but it can also mean danger, destruction and war.

Lantern strike (severe loneliness) promotes togetherness, Asian transnationalism and solidarity across borders despite national and international crises. Wu’s nine paper lanterns are similar to specific local lantern designs, and their titles include the corresponding telephone country codes. Foreign body # 2 umbra and penumbra (+84), refers to Vietnam, is a blue diamond-shaped lantern that hangs from a pole that rests in a round glass vase on a low wooden base. Foreign body # 2 umbra and penumbra (+63 prototype)meaning the Philippines is a pink star-shaped lantern also hanging on a stick with a wooden armature and a similar base that supports it. There is a rabbit for Hong Kong, a pagoda for Indonesia, and a flower for Myanmar. Thailand hangs highest, while the South Korean lantern appears to be on its side. The lanterns are grouped together like a glowing pre-colonial or post-colonial reunion, a coalition of neighbors, demonstrators or a striking union.

To further explore the cinematic resonance, Wu embeds digital cameras in her lanterns. You are inactive in the gallery, which suggests images are coming. There is often text on lanterns – names, wishes or riddles – but the messages of Wu’s lanterns have yet to be determined. The lanterns resemble a vigilant community – watching us and watching one another – suspicious perhaps due to the violent past, persistent colonial attitudes, and an uncertain future. The digital camera processes and generates light like the lantern; At both ends of a temporal spectrum, the camera and the lantern have a lot in common.

Wu’s drawings use ink, mineral pigments, and glue on Japanese paper to historicize her interest in these lights. Lantern Study 01 (woman admires plum blossoms at night) and Lantern Study 02 (Lighting a Hanging Lantern for the Obon Festival) are based on Japanese woodblock prints, the first from the 18th century by Suzuki Harunobu, the second from the 19th century by Shibata Zeshin. in the Lantern Study 01, a woman uses a lantern to provide light at night while looking at a flowering tree. in the Lantern Study 02another woman lights a hanging lantern as a signal to her ancestors. In these two intimate scenarios, the lanterns, like cameras, help to connect with other worlds.

TS (heaven) is based on a section of the Tang Dynasty silk scroll, Eighty-seven heavenly bodies, sometimes, perhaps incorrectly, attributed to the eighth century Chinese painter Wu Daozi. The scroll shows a procession of gods wearing ornate poles and hairstyles with what appears to be ribbons, flowers and precious stones. There are no lanterns in this spiritual drawing, but the scroll makes reference to the cinema. A scroll unfolds like a movie over time.

Strong loneliness, A one-channel, nine and a half minute video serves as the final scene in the exhibition. Wu took the video with one of the lantern cameras that were programmed to detect shadows. Shadow detection is typically used to clean up images, sometimes in surveillance. Wu traveled through New York City, lantern camera in hand. In the video recording, their paths look like a fast-moving patchwork of layered lightmaps. Realistic details, such as an aerial view of Manhattan and a protest, are fleeting and quickly overtaken by colorful shapes. We hear children play, but we don’t see them. Buildings are warped and rounded as if the lantern camera were forcing a fisheye view. The city is no longer exclusively architectural or human. Instead, it’s an exuberant mix of color, line and sound. The shapes change everywhere along the way.

In Wu’s work, lanterns address spatial, historical, spiritual and political areas. And with lanterns in hand, abstraction follows quickly. According to a Chinese legend, an emperor once planned to burn a hunting village after the hunter accidentally killed the emperor’s prized bird. Instead, the villagers worked together to light lanterns and set off fireworks, thereby fooling the emperor’s soldiers who stayed away because from a distance it looked like the village was already on fire. In this legend, the interpretation or misinterpretation of the light saved the church. It became the stuff of legend. Or, as Wu might say, it was a visual experience worth considering as a proto-cinema. It was an evocation of light and powerful and multivalent symbolism.



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High energy efficiency in the Mocape. by COOP HIMMELBLAU https://crewgonzaga.com/high-energy-efficiency-in-the-mocape-by-coop-himmelblau/ https://crewgonzaga.com/high-energy-efficiency-in-the-mocape-by-coop-himmelblau/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 06:32:15 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/high-energy-efficiency-in-the-mocape-by-coop-himmelblau/ The twin museum for contemporary art and planning (MOCAPE) built by COOP HIMMELB (L) AU in Shenzhen is a building with high energy efficiency. The quarter in which it is located has a high density of cultural buildings whose urban planning is based on axiality and symmetry. Given the context, the architects seized the opportunity […]]]>


The twin museum for contemporary art and planning (MOCAPE) built by COOP HIMMELB (L) AU in Shenzhen is a building with high energy efficiency. The quarter in which it is located has a high density of cultural buildings whose urban planning is based on axiality and symmetry. Given the context, the architects seized the opportunity to create a building that creates a volumetric dialogue with the surrounding structures, but stands out completely from the philosophy of the location. They do this by harnessing the dual nature of the functions of the MOCAPE, the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) and the Planning Exhibition (PE).
The design concept is divided into two bodies, which are connected by an entrance arch with a lattice structure that is clad with aluminum. Inside, the idea reappears in the overhead lines, the shapes of which are so tense and seductive that they seduce the visitor to walk. The interiors are all lined with a large self-supporting shell made of strong steel ribs, which in turn is covered with a glass skin, which lets daylight into the hall and some rooms. The skin consists of triangular elements that follow the hyperbolic shapes of the architects to give the whole a uniformity. This reduces the curvature of each individual element to a minimum, which offers enormous advantages for production and economy. The surfaces, based on the volumes of the exhibition rooms, are clad with micro-perforated aluminum to protect the glass inside from the sun’s rays and to dramatically illuminate the building at night.
The interiors contain the finest materials, as large stone slabs cover the volume of the hall, while the second central point, which surrounds the staircase, is clad with a cloud of mirror-polished sheet metal to give the room arrangement an unusual dynamic. The systems that regulate everyday life in the museum use solar and geothermal heat, while the heat generated by the greenhouse effect of the glass is used to heat the water, based on a specific system planning that is intended to make the entire operation environmentally and environmentally friendly.

Fabrizio Orsini

Client: Shenzhen Municipal Culture Bureau, Shenzhen, China
Shenzhen Municipal Planning Office, Shenzhen, China

Planning: COOP HIMMELB (L) AU – Wolf D. Prix & Partner ZT GmbH
Head of Design: Wolf D. Prix
Project partner: Markus Prossnigg
Design Architects: Quirin Krumbholz, Jörg Hugo, Mona Bayr
Project architects: Angus Schoenberger, Veronika Janovska, Tyler Bornstein
Project coordination: Xinyu Wan
Project team: Jessie Castro, Jessie Chen, Jasmin Dieterle, Luis Ferreira, Peter Grell, Paul Hoszowsky, Dimitar Ivanov, Ivana Jug, Zhu Yuang Kang, Alexander Karaivanov, Nam La-Chi, Rodelle Lee, Feng Lei, Megan Lepp, Samuel Liew, Thomas Margaretha, Jens Mehlan, Ivo de Nooijer, Reinhard Platzl, Vincenzo Possenti, Pete Rose, Ana Santos, Jutta Schädler, Günther Weber, Chen Yue
Digital project team: Angus Schoenberger, Matt Kirkham, Jasmin Dieterle, Jonathan Asher, Jan Brosch
Local Architects: HSArchitects, Shenzhen, China
Local interior design: Jiang & Associates Interior Design Co., Ltd
Structural analysis: B + G Ingenieure, Bollinger and Grohmann GmbH, Frankfurt, Germany
Mechanical engineering: Reinhold Bacher, Vienna, Austria
Blitz Design: AG Licht, Bonn, Germany
Cost management: Davis Langdon & Seah, Hong Kong, China

PROJECT DATA
Site area: 21,688 m²
Gross floor area: 80,000 m²
Building height / length / width: 40 m / 160 m / 140 m²
Photography:
© Duccio Malagamba
© Shu He
© Sergio Pirrone
Sketch:
© COOP HIMMELB (L) AU
Plans & Diagrams:
© COOP HIMMELB (L) AU



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Shilpa Gupta and the Art of Infiltration https://crewgonzaga.com/shilpa-gupta-and-the-art-of-infiltration/ https://crewgonzaga.com/shilpa-gupta-and-the-art-of-infiltration/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 03:30:00 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/shilpa-gupta-and-the-art-of-infiltration/ Shilpa Gupta (born 1976) The works can be seen at ‘Today Will End’, which opened on May 21 and can be seen until September 12, 2021 at M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Antwerp. Move Shilpa Gupta lives and works in Mumbai, India, where she studied sculpture at the Sir JJ School of Fine Arts […]]]>


Shilpa Gupta (born 1976)

The works can be seen at ‘Today Will End’, which opened on May 21 and can be seen until September 12, 2021 at M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Antwerp.

Move

Shilpa Gupta lives and works in Mumbai, India, where she studied sculpture at the Sir JJ School of Fine Arts (1992-1997). Her work has been shown in leading institutions such as the Tate Modern, MoMA, Center Pompidou, Mori Art Museum, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and near the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art and the Devi Art Foundation.

Gupta’s work is one of the first Indian contemporary artists to embrace the new media as their profession. uses sculpture, installation, text, and photography; and shows a mastery of audio and visual technologies.

She has often spoken of the impact of the 1992 communal unrest in Mumbai as a formative experience that shows in her preoccupation with ideas of movement, boundaries, surveillance, crowd psychology and the other. While her work shows an enormous aesthetic diversity, she consolidated her artistic language at an early age, at the age of 24 Aar couple, a public art exchange between India and Pakistan that she made possible with the Pakistani artist Huma Mulji.



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Israeli Bauhaus: Global style with a local twist https://crewgonzaga.com/israeli-bauhaus-global-style-with-a-local-twist/ https://crewgonzaga.com/israeli-bauhaus-global-style-with-a-local-twist/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 11:17:02 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/israeli-bauhaus-global-style-with-a-local-twist/ In the 20th century, a broad spectrum of artistic movements emerged, from small and local to broad and international. But only a few have shaped art as sustainably and sustainably as the Bauhaus. Today, Bauhaus influence can be seen around the world, with the largest collection of Bauhaus architecture located in central Tel Aviv, Israel. […]]]>


In the 20th century, a broad spectrum of artistic movements emerged, from small and local to broad and international. But only a few have shaped art as sustainably and sustainably as the Bauhaus. Today, Bauhaus influence can be seen around the world, with the largest collection of Bauhaus architecture located in central Tel Aviv, Israel.

What is Bauhaus?

bauhaus originated as a German art school, which was founded by Walter Gropius in 1919 in order to unite all art branches under one roof. The school taught a wide range of techniques including (but not limited to) architecture, bookbinding, graphics and advertising, painting, metalworking, furniture design, sculpture, pottery, and photography.

The Bauhaus School quickly gained international recognition for its unique aesthetics. The approach places a special emphasis on function, balanced forms and abstract forms, while deviating from ornamentation. The special qualities of the Bauhaus have been referred to as “international style” as it strongly influenced the course of modern and contemporary art around the world.

The school originated in Weimar, Germany, but over time two other locations emerged in Dessau and Berlin. Although every art form was of equal importance to the school, Dessau in particular became known for its focus on architecture.

Although Gropius designed numerous buildings before founding the Bauhaus School, the architecture department was not opened until 1927 under the direction of Hannes Meyer. Here Meyer trained a generation of world-famous architects and thus established an international architectural style.

The influence of Meyer’s teachings reached the whole world, but it is particularly noticeable in Tel Aviv’s “White City”.

Bauhaus in Israel

In the course of the development of the Bauhaus School, it was shaped and guided by certain political ideals. The majority of Bauhaus artists adopted socialist and communist beliefs. In addition, many students and teachers were Jewish.

When the NSDAP came to power in 1933, the school was forcibly disbanded, forcing thousands of artists to leave Germany. Among them was a group that was after Mandatory Palestinewhere its members would put into practice what they have learned in Europe.

Although Tel Aviv Founded in 1909, it did not develop into an urban center until about a decade later – during British rule. In 1925, the Tel Aviv City Council commissioned the English Sir Patrick Geddes to plan the city map. His urban vision was characterized by large green areas and a strong emphasis on traffic routes.

But after the Nazi occupation in Germany and Austria forced tens of thousands of Jews to flee, Tel Aviv’s population grew to an extent that Geddes had not foreseen. This sudden influx gave a big boost to the Israeli Bauhaus-trained architects who spearheaded the creation of the “White City” that would later serve as the bustling center of Tel Aviv.



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“Vanishing Bangkok” is both a work of art and a compelling call for monument protection https://crewgonzaga.com/vanishing-bangkok-is-both-a-work-of-art-and-a-compelling-call-for-monument-protection/ https://crewgonzaga.com/vanishing-bangkok-is-both-a-work-of-art-and-a-compelling-call-for-monument-protection/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 09:00:36 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/vanishing-bangkok-is-both-a-work-of-art-and-a-compelling-call-for-monument-protection/ Bangkok is famous for its temples, markets, food, and other delights. Architecturally, however, mostly only the palatial shopping centers and towers made of glass and steel are considered. Awe-inspiring attention to the architecture from the city’s past is paid to the royal palaces and mansions, influenced by European mansions and housing the kingdom’s aristocracy. It […]]]>


Bangkok is famous for its temples, markets, food, and other delights. Architecturally, however, mostly only the palatial shopping centers and towers made of glass and steel are considered. Awe-inspiring attention to the architecture from the city’s past is paid to the royal palaces and mansions, influenced by European mansions and housing the kingdom’s aristocracy. It takes real effort to discover the beauty of Bangkok’s ancient indigenous architecture, threatened by the rapid development of this sprawling metropolis.

The photographer Ben Davies spent decades in Southeast Asia before he was fascinated by the abandoned and decaying buildings from Bangkok’s early history. In 2014 he bought a camera that bordered on antiquity, with film, lots of lenses, a tall tripod and a black cloth that protects the heads of the photographers in old films. “Just setting up this unwieldy camera on a tripod can take 10 minutes,” says Davies, and taking pictures can take up to half an hour.

“Why don’t you take nice photos of the city?” Asked a security guard once while observing this elaborate process of taking photos. But Davies was intrigued by the different architectural styles he saw in the old buildings: Indian, Khmer, Burmese, Chinese, Portuguese, all fused into one completely Thai form. He spent five years tracking down and photographing these places before they could disappear from sight and memory.

The pictures in The disappearing Bangkok: the changing face of the city are in black and white, with razor-sharp details and clarity. Each of them fills a whole page in a book that is itself a work of art and a compelling call for monument protection.

His images are haunting. A house surrounded by trees is tumbling dangerously towards a nearby canal. A towered mansion surrounded by rubble and a balcony sinks into the earth as it slowly falls into disrepair. A house that has stood for two centuries is engulfed by vines and the roots of banyan trees and looks like a ruined jungle temple. Even more poignant, however, are the shophouses, which are still doing business and still inhabited by families who know full well that they are the last generation to live there.

These functional wooden buildings are adorned with Palladian windows and decorated with intricate wood carvings. There are traditional medicine home grinders, barber chairs that have been in use for 100 years, coffee shops that bear no resemblance to Starbucks, and shrines of Chinese deities that are still visited by devotees. These humble and doomed places have living histories that deserve to be honored.

In the heart of Bangkok, under one of the city’s busiest Skytrain stations, lie two wooden buildings framed by a wild ganglia of power cables, their doors opening onto the street. Surrounded by shiny shopping malls selling imported luxuries from Porsche to haute couture, they somehow survive and give hope to similar structures in a city where “the ordinary has little cultural value”. Perhaps the beauty of Davies’ photographs will add strength to the conservation battle that recently erupted in Bangkok, while the art of his work is sure to delight and inspire photography enthusiasts around the world.

A kind of backing band from Davies’ publisher, Unseen Siam: Early Photography, 1860-1910, has received the same care and artful production that characterize the offerings of the Bangkok boutique publisher River Books. The almost 400-page encyclopedic work is a history of photography, not a history of Siam, and testifies to how far the art of the camera has advanced in just over a century.

The art historian Joachim K. Bautze has compiled 50 years of work by 15 photographers, all from the West, with the exception of Kaishu Isonaga from Japan, who receives a few pages of company photos at the end of the book.

Bautze provides a wealth of details for almost every photo: when it was taken, where it can be seen, who donated it, its dimensions, inventory number and administration number. Unfortunately, all information on the subject of the photo is limited to the caption, which can benevolently be described as poor.

Most of the space is given to Siamese royalty, with landscapes and the occasional photos of everyday life often crowded onto one page. Since the book is organized by photographer rather than topic, the repetition is a bit annoying and rather boring. It quickly becomes clear that King Mongkut was a grumpy looking monarch and his son King Chulalongkorn was definitely hot. Royal descendants and wives periodically glare somewhat shyly from the sides, and there are posed pictures of girls who are young examples of what used to be called cheesecake photography.

Far too much attention is paid to “business cards,” postcard-sized portraits of Europeans in Southeast Asia, their families and their Victorian salons. Although the book’s title promises a glimpse of Siam, there are few photographs that deviate from Bangkok’s borders, and many that go further afield were taken in Singapore, Burma, and Cambodia. A handful of show views of Ayutthaya and Chiang Mai, but these almost feel like an afterthought.

Occasionally a page contains a single landscape, usually of the banks of the river that was Bangkok’s main thoroughfare, or a shot of elephant hunters in the countryside, but most of these photos show people who could afford the services of a photographer.

This story of pioneering photographers will be interesting as a source to academic researchers and a source of disappointment to almost anyone else.

For more art click here



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Scene at MIT: the beauty of nature and architecture in no time at all | MIT news https://crewgonzaga.com/scene-at-mit-the-beauty-of-nature-and-architecture-in-no-time-at-all-mit-news/ https://crewgonzaga.com/scene-at-mit-the-beauty-of-nature-and-architecture-in-no-time-at-all-mit-news/#respond Fri, 09 Jul 2021 19:20:00 +0000 https://crewgonzaga.com/scene-at-mit-the-beauty-of-nature-and-architecture-in-no-time-at-all-mit-news/ “I started my postdoc in February 2020. Despite my short time enjoying life at MIT, I immediately experienced how alive it was at the Stata Center! It is an architectural landmark of the modern age and a meeting place for students and employees. It’s a special place and I thought it deserved a special picture. […]]]>


“I started my postdoc in February 2020. Despite my short time enjoying life at MIT, I immediately experienced how alive it was at the Stata Center! It is an architectural landmark of the modern age and a meeting place for students and employees. It’s a special place and I thought it deserved a special picture.

I work in bioengineering and study chromatin conformation with super-resolution microscopy. Therefore, I am very passionate about photographing the world, from DNA molecules to spectacular landscapes! I also like challenges, and I’ve noticed that thunderstorms are relatively rare in the Boston area and storms blow very quickly. It’s difficult to capture, especially with the composition you envision. I had tried to get this picture that I had in mind a few times before, but I was not satisfied.

I recently watched the weather carefully as I was planning a little road trip to enjoy the beauty of New England. I then realized that I had to cancel my trip because severe thunderstorms were predicted that are not very friendly to driving – but perfect for taking photos! As I was taking microscopic photographs, I realized that a potential thunderstorm would have crossed my workplace. So I drove home without hesitation and despite the rain to get my camera equipment and came back to the lab, from where I have a nice view of the Stata Center. The bottom line is that I photographed both microscopic and giant natural phenomena at the same time! It was such a rewarding day. “

—Michele Gabriele, postdoc in the field of bioengineering

Do you have a creative photo of campus life that you want to share? Send it to Scene at MIT.



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